Tag Archives: Kenya

Save a Life this Christmas

Great news!

The Milele Christmas Gifts are now available! They make a perfect gift for ‘hard-to-buy-for’ people this year! Donate to Milele this christmas and we will buy a mosquito net (£5) or a food parcel (£10) for a family in Kenya. In return you will get a gift certificate to pass on to someone in this country explaining why the gift is so important  – the ideal substitute for a box of chocolates or a bottle of wine.

Mosquito Nets (£5)

With malaria one of the biggest killers of children under 5 in this area, nets keep little ones safe during their first few years of life. They are specially treated to provide maximum protection.

6 month old twins making good use of your mosquito net donations last year
6 month old twins making good use of your mosquito net donations last year

Food Parcels (£10)

No family should be hungry this Christmas. Food parcels provide healthy and tasty sustenance to families who are malnourished and struggling for food.

Food parcels are a great way to help families who are hungry this christmas
Food parcels are a great way to help families who are hungry this christmas

To Order:

To order a net or a food parcel drop me an email to amy@milele.org.uk

Lets make a real difference

Last year together we managed to give Mosquito nets and food parcels to 38 families. After visiting the homes of these families and seeing the incredible difference they make, I can truly tell you there really is no better way to spend your money this year. One mother told me she had been really scared of Malaria after the long rainy season, but since receiving the net, not one of her children has contracted Malaria. This year we can do even better – we can reach even more children and families and save more lives.

Thank-you

MONTHLY UPDATES FOR FEB

Hello everyone,welcome to our monthly updates.

We are indeed thankful to Milele organization for making things happen in a good way.
I would like also to acknowledge the sponsors for their good work towards Milele organization.
This month our sponsored children,have been really working hard to improve their grades in this Month exams.
We have high expectation for them to do better than in last month exam.
I also got a chance to visit our senior boy at Malindi High School.Whereby we discussed his performance with several teachers.
We also bought some set books for him on which he will be examined on during his final exam.
He is also doing well,he has to put more effort in improving his grades.Things are becoming more challenging for all the students at his level.
He is focused and knows that, to pass with good grades he must put extra effort in school work to achieve his goals.
The uniform checking it has been a big competition and very difficult to get the best pupil who maintained hes / her uniform the best. its like if all of them have emerged to be winner, which makes it difficult to reward them all!
We pass our gratitude to all the sponsors and well wishers who value the life of a child, God will value your life more.
Thank you all.

Mtwapa on the BBC

Hi All,

Amy and I were just sitting down to watch some television tonight and we noticed a program which grabbed our attention; ‘Tourism and the Truth: Stacey Dooley’. It is a very interesting program about tourism in Kenya and it features the costal area of Kenya where we work. We recognised many of the shots of residential to be Mtwapa and the surrounding areas. It is very odd to see this on television and it does show Mtwapa as it is.

You can watch the program here: Tourism and the Truth: Stacey Dooley. It will be avalible on BBC iPlayer til 1:19AM Thu, 23 Jun 2011.

It is a really great program and we are going to finish watching it now!

Rich

Here in Mtwapa

Hello All,

We landed in Kenya yesterday and have big plans for our trip this time. As well as checking on the progress of our boys we will also be arranging the first volunteer programme for Milele. We also have lots of shoes and clothes to give out as well as some school supplies for one of the local community schools.

Keep checking the site for more news and hopefully a few pictures!

Rich and Amy

More Photos of Mbazi

Waiting for lunch!
Waiting for lunch!

Photographs of the nursery school are on their way, in the mean time there are a few more of the feeding programme last saturday! Enjoy!

Great to see everybody eating
Great to see everybody eating
Playing with the camera
Playing with the camera
Playing with the camera
Playing with the camera
The classroom for 40 nursery school children and the kitchen at weekends; feeding 200
The classroom for 40 nursery school children and the kitchen at weekends; feeding 200
Yummy Yummy!
Yummy Yummy!
Queuing to get their food
Queuing to get their food
Children gathering ready for the food!
Children gathering ready for the food!

Mbazi Community Association

On saturday we took a trip to visit a new group for the first time. The group is based in a very rural area towards Takaungu called ‘Gorofani’. The name of the town means ‘place with a storey building’ on account of the fact that near the main road passing through the town there is a two-storey house; quite a rarity in this area!

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The Kitchen and nursery school, catering for 200 hungry mouths!

The group itself is comprised of 12 local adults who founded an association to provide aid for needy children, orphans and those living with only one parent or in very impoverished circumstances. The group provides a feeding programme every Saturday with 200 children already registered in its first year of running. This week more than 150 children came to eat rice and beans. The group also has a nursery school running in the mornings from Monday to Friday to provide education for 40 of the youngest children who cannot walk the 8 kilometres to the nearest school and back every day. The group has documented more than 600 orphans, one parent children and needy children in the very local area alone who are currently not receiving regular meals or any education and could therefore benefit from its support.

The projects currently receive some support from the government in the form of flour, rice and beans to distribute, any extra costs are currently being scraped together using small weekly donations from the committee members, local volunteer staff, cooks and teachers.

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Yummy Yummy!

Although the intentions of this project and its potential are fantastic and the resourcefulness and dedication of the association’s members is astounding; it brings a whole new meaning to the phrase ‘living on a shoe-string’!

The kitchen for all 200 children is transformed during the week into the nursery school, and the cooking equipment consists of one very large metal pot, a large spoon made of coconut shell, wood for the fire and a box of matches. There is also a nearby freshwater well which has been built by the members and this water is used for the cooking.

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Playing football with a ball made of plastic bags
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Cooking for all the children

I hope you enjoy these photos as much as we enjoyed the day. It was truly special to see such a  well managed, independent local group doing such good work with such a small amount of money. Keep your eyes peeled for more pictures of this group when we go back there tomorrow!

We have Landed!

Hello everyone!

We have arrived in Kenya and are pleased to find everyone so well and happy.

We have visited the school where all the children are very busy doing their end of term examinations in preparation for the easter break in two weeks time.

This afternoon we are going to the childrens home to distibute all the sponsors’ letters and gifts so keep you eyes peeled for photos and more updates coming soon!

Amy and Rich

Mtwapa Academy – School Photo

Hi all,

So here it is… the Official Mtwapa Academy School Photo 2009.

Mtwapa Academy 2009
Mtwapa Academy 2009

This is one of many photos taken (including a serious one which Madam Director requested before the thumbs revealed). It took around half an hour to organise the children into a vague semblance of order before the photos could be taken (which took about 2 mins).

Anyway hope you all like it.

Rich

More about the Boys!

 

A Recent photo of the four boys; Charo (back left), Kaingu (Left), Emmanuel (Front) and Safari (Right)
A Recent photo of the four boys; Charo (back left), Kaingu (Left), Emmanuel (Front) and Safari (Right)

We thought you might be chomping at the bit for more information about the first four sponsored boys on the programme, so we thought we would give you a bit of background to them and why they are sponsored now.

 

When we first met Charo, Safari, Kaingu and Emmanuel they were four brothers in a family of 11 children, all staying in a dilapidated mud hut in a rural village called Takaungu; about 40 minutes north along the coastline from Mtwapa. The family consisted of 7 girls and 4 boys, their (estimated) ages ranging between the eldest at 15 years and the youngest at 2 years.  The ages are all estimates since the children don’t know their dates of birth and because they were not born in hospitals but in the village they do not have formal birth notification cards! 

The boy’s father had recently passed away, and his three wives, the mothers of the children, had all abandoned them. They had one uncle who was attempting to help them with food and clothing, but who was also struggling to feed his own family. Consequently, they were living alone. The boys were working in a local quarry making bricks to earn a small amount of money for food, but the family were struggling to make ends meet. The house they were sleeping in was impossibly small, with almost no furniture and all four walls were in a state of severe disrepair; it was clear they could not remain in this situation any longer.

 

The whole 'Kadowe' family at Takaungu recieving balloons, toys and some food
The whole 'Kadowe' family at Takaungu recieving balloons, toys and some food

We began to look for alternative accomodation for all the children, hoping to find them stable places to live where they would recieve food, water and access to education. The chief of the village and the district childrens officer along with some relatives of the children we traced in Takaungu all suggested children’s homes to be the best option and the search began!

 

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The boys with all their sisters preparing to leave for the childrens homes, at the front in their sunday best are Agnes, Karembo, Amina and Dama ready to head off to Riziki..

After finding many homes full to the rafters we came across Riziki Children’s Home, and New Light Boys Home. The guardians at these homes were happy to accept the 8 youngest children and so four of the girls are now staying in Riziki and attending school there. The eldest 3 girls are now living in the village with their uncle, but without the babies to look after, are able to go to school and feed themselves more easily.

 

The boys on their first day at New Light, from Left to Right; the boys' uncle, Mr Samwel the guardian of the home with his small son John (front), Charo, Safari, Emmanuel and Kaingu.    .
The boys on their first day at New Light, from Left to Right; the boys' uncle, Mr Samwel the guardian of the home with his small son John (front), Charo, Safari, Emmanuel and Kaingu. .

1 year on, Charo, Safari, Kaingu and Emmanuel are now fully settled into the New Light Children’s Home in Mtwapa and are firm friends with many of the other boys living there. They are also now attending Mtwapa Academy, one of the best schools in the area, and are newly sponsored as part of Milele.

 

We are intending to help New Light and Riziki Childrens Homes in their respective endeavours to begin a regular connection and link the boys and girls together again. We also hope to instigate visits between the boys hometown of Takaungu where the eldest sisters are staying and the two homes so the connection between them does not weaken.

Over the next few days we are hoping to post some individual profiles of the boys so you will get to know them with us!

We are the Fundi!!

 

Marcie and Fai fixing a poorly desk in the fundi hospital
Mercy and Fai fixing a poorly desk in the fundi hospital

 

 During the summer holidays over the last two days before school opened officially we have been at Mtwapa Academy searching for damaged desks, chairs or benches which can be recycled, fixed and re-used in classrooms. We have taken to our new mantle of ‘fundi’ (An all round swahili word for ‘tradesman’) and are enjoying hammering and sawing with two of the directors children Eric and Mercy…although we often find that despite their youth they can far out do our feeble efforts!

Eric shows Amy and Fai who is the best fundi in Mtwapa!
Eric shows Amy and Fai who is the best fundi in Mtwapa!

 

Now the children are all back at school, and nothing has fallen apart (yet!) so fingers crossed it all seems to have gone very well!!